Reptiles & Amphibians

The reptiles and amphibians of Floyds Fork are those creatures hiding in the weeds. They are beautiful and interesting creatures. From turtles to snakes and everything in between, the reptiles and amphibians of Floyds Fork add a personality separate from any other in the area. Some of the most fascinating creatures fall into these categories and can be seen throughout Floyds Fork. Some of these species can be seen in the list below. The name and description of each animal is located to the left or right of their picture.

[Table of Contents]

Reptiles
Garter Snake (Thamnophis sirtalis) - Common species of reptile observed in the Floyds Fork area. 18-26 inches, black and yellow stripes. ff_garter.jpg (18123 bytes)
ff_sftshturtle.jpg (11564 bytes) Spiny Softshell Turtle (Trionyx spinifer) - Common species of reptile observed in the Floyds Fork area. 1-3 feet in length. This turtle has a flat back and a dull color.
Box Turtle (Terrapene carolina) - Common species of reptile observed in the Floyds Fork area. The box turtle is one of the most common turtles in the Floyds Fork area. It is commonly seen on the side of the road and is kept as a pet by many people.

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Painted Turtle (Chrysemys picta) - Common species of reptile observed in the Floyds Fork area. 4-10 inches, green or brownish, yellow border surrounding each shield, yellow streaks on head, neck and limbs.
Red-eared Turtle (Chresemys scripta) - Common species of reptile observed in the Floyds Fork area. This brightly colored turtle gets its name from the red color on the sides of the turtle's head. If you look close enough you can see these red marks.

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Common Water Snake (Natrix sipedon) - Common species of reptile observed in the Floyds Fork area. Up to 4 and 1/2 feet, Gray, brown or tan with darker bands on anterior end. Dark angular blotches posteriorly. Yellow or gray underneath.
Fence Lizard (Sceloporus undulatus) - Common reptile in upland habitats and bottomland terraces. 7 and 1/4 inches, mottled brown to grayish, 2 lighter stripes down back.

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Black Rat Snake (Elaphe obsoleta) - Common reptile in upland habitats and bottomland terraces. 42-72 inches, bluish black.
Black Snake (Coluber constrictor) - Common reptile in upland habitats and bottomland terraces. 30-60 inches, uniform brown, olive or gray.

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Hog-nose Snake (Heterodon platyrhinos) - Common reptile in upland habitats and bottomland terraces. This snake has a banded body from head to tail with the bands getting smaller as they get closer to the tail.
Copperhead (Agkistrodon contortrix) - A venomous species of reptile observed in the area. 2 and 1/2 to 4 feet, broad chestnut-red bands, body is copper, orange or pink.

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Timber Rattlesnake (Crotalus horridus) - A venomous species of reptile observed in the area. 36-54 inches, black and yellow. Has a rattle on the end of its tail. The yellow stripe runs down the middle of its back and the black marks are wide bands that wrap around the body.
Amphibians
Bullfrog (Rana catesbeiana) - An amphibian observed in the Floyds Fork study area. Largest frog in U.S., 8 inches long, hind legs are 10 inches, yellowish-green or olive-green back, white belly with brown markings.  

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Green Frog (Rana clamitans) - An amphibian observed in the Floyds Fork study area. The green frog is obviously green colored and is one of the most common frogs in the area.
Cricket Frog (Acris crepitans) - An amphibian observed in the Floyds Fork study area. 3/4 inch to 1 and 1/2 inches, grayish or greenish, white markings on upper lip, dark triangle on head.

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Fowler’s Toad (Bufo woodhousei fowleri) - An amphibian observed in the Floyds Fork study area. This frog is dull colored with dark blotches on its back.
Southern Leopard Frog (Rana sphenocephala) - Common species of amphibian in Floyds Fork. The leopard frog gets its name from the leopard-like spots it has all over its bright greenish body.

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American Toad (Bufo americanus) - Common species of amphibian in Floyds Fork. Size of person's fist. Many bland colors all over the body of the American toad.
Mudpuppy (Necturus maculosus) - Common species of amphibian in Floyds Fork. Large salamander. Up to 17 inches, slimy, dark brown, gray brown, black with darker spots. Powerful flat tail and 4 weak legs.

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Dusky Salamander (Desmognathus fuscus) - A common and relatively abundant species of amphibian found in and along small tributaries.
Two-lined Salamander (Eurycea bislineata) - A common and relatively abundant species of amphibian found in and along small tributaries.

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Zigzag Salamander (Plethodon dorsalis) - Common species of amphibian in the woodlands area. A dark-colored salamander with an orange zig-zag stripe on its back.
Slimy Salamander (Plethodon glutinosus) - Common species of amphibian in the woodlands area. This creatively designed salamander has a black body and white spots all over.

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Red Salamander (Pseudotriton ruber) - Common species of amphibian in the woodlands area. The red salamander is a reddish color with dark spots on its entire body.
Smallmouthed Salamander (Ambystoma texanum) - Common species of amphibian in the woodlands area. This is a smaller salamander and is darkly colored with slighly lighter marks. They have a small mouth.

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Tiger Salamander (Ambystona tigrinum) - Common species of amphibian in the woodlands area. A dark colored salamander with yellowish markings spread out over its body.
Spring Peepers (Hyla crucifer) - Species of amphibian observed in wet thickets shallow ponds and grassy swales on the floodplain. 1-5 inches, changes color.

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Chorus Frogs (Pseudacris triseriata) - Species of amphibian observed in wet thickets shallow ponds and grassy swales on the floodplain. 1 and 1/2 inches, gray, green olive or reddish with irregular green or brown stripes or spots.

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