Shrubs & Vines

The shrubs and vines of Floyds Fork are in great number and variety. From poisonous to friendly, these plants fill in the cracks of the flora section of the area. Without them Floyds Fork would not be the same. The types of shrubs and vines in Floyds Fork are listed below. The name and description of each plant is located to the left or right of their picture.

[Table of Contents]

 

Poison Ivy (Rhus Randicans) - Low growing, even the smoke from the burning Poison Ivy can cause serious poisoning.
Virginia Creeper (Parthenocissus quinquefolia) - Low growing, even the smoke of the burning Virginia creeper can cause severe skin irritation.
Frost Grape (Vitis vulpina) - One of a variety of grape species found anywhere from Pennsylvania to Florida.

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Stinging Nettle (Laportea candaensis) - Tiny stinging spines that were thought to be poisonous; used in ancient times for food, dye, and home remedies.
Smartweed (Polygonum) - Leaves are acrid, pungent, and antiseptic; various medical uses, homeostatic drug; 18” height with reddish stems, lanceolate leaves; yellow-gold dye can be produced.
Jewelweed (Imaptiens pallida and I. capensis) - Used for Poison Ivy poisoning, found in the east and as far west as Nebraska, in cool and damp places.
Fall phlox (Phlox paniculata) - Herbaceous ground vegetation on the bank and adjacent primary terraces of the stream.
White Snakeroot (Eupatorium rugosum) - Herbaceous ground vegetation on the bank and adjacent primary terraces of the stream.
Mistflower (E. coelestinum) - Herbaceous ground vegetation on the bank and adjacent primary terraces of the stream.
Monkeyflower (Mimulus alatus) - Herbaceous ground vegetation on the bank and adjacent primary terraces of the stream.
Great Blue Lobelia (Lobelia siphilitica) - Was thought to be important in the cure for the venereal disease syphilis, but the specific name was given many years ago when rumors went around that it had such a value; is considered to be one of America’s finest wild flowers even though it is not useful except for beauty.

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Spicebush (Lindera benzoin) - Shrub found on the terraces rather than on the stream bank.
Strawberrybush (Euonymus americanus) - Shrub found on the terraces rather than on the stream bank.
Greenbriers (Smilax) - Shrub found on the terraces rather than on the stream bank.
Wild Hydrangea (Hydrangea arborscens) - Shrub found on the terraces rather than on the stream bank.
Giant Ragweed (Ambrosia trifida) - Ground cover vegetation evident in the fall 1980.
Polk (Phytolacca americana) - Ground cover vegetation evident in the fall 1980.
Wingstem (Actinomeris alterinfolia) - Ground cover vegetation evident in the fall 1980.
Violets (viola) - Ground cover vegetation evident in the fall 1980.
Jumpseed (Polygonum virginicum) - Ground cover vegetation evident in the fall 1980.
Asters (Aster) - Ground cover vegetation evident in the fall 1980.

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Goldenrod (Solidago) - Ground cover vegetation evident in the fall 1980.
Sticktights (Desmodium) - Ground cover vegetation evident in the fall 1980.
Papaw (Asimina triloba) - One of the most abundant shrubs.
Cleavers (Galium aparine) - Vine found on the side slopes.
Tall Bellflower (Campanula americana) - Vine found on the side slopes.
Blueberries (Vaccinium) - Shrub sometimes occurring in these dry woodlands.
Birdfoot Violet (Viola pedata) - Woody vine.
Wooly Blue Violet (Viola sororia) - Woody vine.
Downy Phlox (Phlox pilosa) - Woody vine.
Wood-Betony (Pedicularis canadensis) - Woody vine.

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Common Thistle (Cirsium vulgare) - Usually found in the woodlands adjacent to the highway and railroad corridors that cross Floyds Fork and is typical of these disturbed environments; abundant naturalized Eurasian weed.
Queen Anne’s Lace (Daucus carota) - Usually found in the woodlands adjacent to the highway and railroad corridors that cross Floyds Fork and is typical of these disturbed environments; abundant naturalized Eurasian weed.
Common Teasel (Dipsacus sylvestris) - Usually found in the woodlands adjacent to the highway and railroad corridors that cross Floyds Fork and is typical of these disturbed environments; abundant naturalized Eurasian weed.
Multiflora Rose (Rosa multiflora) - Shrubs/vine found in woodlands in upland locations betraying their origins as abandoned fields or pastures.
Sawbriers (Smilax) - Shrubs/vine found in woodlands in upland locations betraying their origins as abandoned fields or pastures.
Blackberries (Rubus) - Shrubs/vine found in woodlands in upland locations betraying their origins as abandoned fields or pastures.
Pasture Rose (Rosa carolina) - Shrubs found in wet, poorly drained fields on the flood plain that are abandoned.
Dewberries (Rubus) - Shrubs found in wet, poorly drained fields on the flood plain that are abandoned.

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Bittersweet (Celastrus scandens) - A species of woody vines characteristic of overgrown fence rows and woods-border habitats.
Cattails (Typha latifolia) - Found in long, linear, poorly drained depression in the floodplain, a shallow marsh.

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Duckweed (Lemna) - Covers the surface of the water in the marsh, and grasses and sedges.
Umbrella Sedge (Cyperus strigosus) - Covers the surface of the water in the marsh, and grasses and sedges.
Bulrushes (Scirpus) - Found in wet meadows and farm ponds.
Pinkweed (Polygonum pensylvanicum) - Emergent aquatic plant observed in a few locations along the stream.

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Water Smartweed (Polygonum punctatum) - Emergent aquatic plant observed in a few locations along the stream.
Lizard’s Tail (Saururus cernuus) - Emergent aquatic plant observed in a few locations along the stream.
Tall Goldenrod (Solidage altissima) - Found in old fields.
Ironweed (Vernonia altissima) - Found in old fields.
Field Thistle (Cirsium discolor) - Found in old fields.

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