Trees

Trees are abundant in Floyds Fork with many different sizes, color, and look. They supply homes for many animals throughout the area and give the area a more private feel. Trees,  although plain, really add life to any place on earth. Below is a list of the different types of trees located in the area. The name and description of each plant is located to the left or right of their picture.

[Table of Contents]

 

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Sycamore (Plantanus occidentalis) - Large woodland tree with enormous leaves and coarse bark.
Box Elder (A. negundo) - Short-lived, coarse tree; sap can be boiled into sugar.

 

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Willow (Salix) - Tall tree with narrow leaves and flowers as catkins, tea can be made from the dried leaves can break up a fever.
Cottonwood (Populus deltoides) - Grows along streams and other wet places, catkins can be eaten raw or boiled in stews. The inner bark is said to be eaten as an emergency food by western Indians.

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Sugar Maple (Acer saccharum) - Found on the side slopes of the valley of Floyds Fork such as those along the stream south of Brush Run Road to the Bullitt County line, where the trees of the flood plain terraces are joined at the toe of the slope.
Black Walnut (Juglans nigra) - Found on the side slopes of the valley of Floyds Fork such as those along the stream south of Brush Run Road to the Bullitt County line, where the trees of the flood plain terraces are joined, at the toe of the slope.

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White Ash (Franxinus americana) - Very hard wood; inner bark is used for tonic, cathartic, and diuretic.
Black Oak (Quercus velutina) - Found on the side slopes of the valley of Floyds Fork such as those along the stream south of Brush Run Road to the Bullitt County line, where the trees of the flood plain terraces are joined, at the toe of the slope.

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Black Willow (Salix nigra) - Dominates the shrub swamp portion of the wetland.
Hackberry (Caletus occidentalis) - Tall tree, found mostly in the more northern sections of the country, leaves similar to that of the common elm in shape, little flowers are followed by small orange, yellow, or red fruit which is sweet and edible raw.
American Elm (Ulmus americana) - Mesic plant species found on secondary terraces high enough removed from the stream to escape frequent flooding.
Pin Oak (Quercus palustris) - Very hard wood;   use of the astringency of the bark for tanning, various colors of dye, from chartreuse to light brown, also used for medical purposes. Inner bark can be cut, dried, and powered for use as an infusion, and for dysentery.
Red Oak (Quercus Rubra) - Found on the side slopes of the valley of Floyds Fork such as those along the stream south of Brush Run Road to the Bullitt County line, where the trees of the flood plain terraces are joined at the toe of the slope.
Red Elm (Ulmus Rubra) - Found on the side slopes of the valley of Floyds Fork such as those along the stream south of Brush Run Road to the Bullitt County line, where the trees of the flood plain terraces are joined at the toe of the slope.
Black Cherry (Prunus serotina) - Found on the side slopes of the valley of Floyds Fork such as those along the stream south of Brush Run Road to the Bullitt County line, where the trees of the flood plain terraces are joined at the toe of the slope.
Bur Oak (Quercus macrocarpa) - Found on the side slopes of the valley of Floyds Fork such as those along the stream south of Brush Run Road to the Bullitt County line, where the trees of the flood plain terraces are joined at the toe of the slope.
Chinquapin Oak (Quercus muehlenbergii) - Found on the side slopes of the valley of Floyds Fork such as those along the stream south of Brush Run Road to the Bullitt County line, where the trees of the flood plain terraces are joined at the toe of the slope.
Shrub Dogwood (Cornus) - Dominates the shrub swamp portion of the wetland.
Scarlet Oak (Quercus coccinea) - Found on the side slopes of the valley of Floyds Fork such as those along the stream south of Brush Run Road to the Bullitt County line, where the trees of the flood plain terraces are joined, at the toe of the slope.
Black Locust (Robinia pseudoacacia) - Found on the side slopes of the valley of Floyds Fork such as those along the stream south of Brush Run Road to the Bullitt County line, where the trees of the flood plain terraces are joined, at the toe of the slope.
Honey Locust (Gleditsia triacanthos) - Found on the side slopes of the valley of Floyds Fork such as those along the stream south of Brush Run Road to the Bullitt County line, where the trees of the flood plain terraces are joined, at the toe of the slope.
Mockernut Hickory (Carya tomentosa) - Found on the side slopes of the valley of Floyds Fork such as those along the stream south of Brush Run Road to the Bullitt County line, where the trees of the flood plain terraces are joined, at the toe of the slope.
Shagbark Hickory (Carya ovata) - Found on the side slopes of the valley of Floyds Fork such as those along the stream south of Brush Run Road to the Bullitt County line, where the trees of the flood plain terraces are joined, at the toe of the slope.
Basswood (Tilia) - Understory trees and saplings of major dominant species found on the sideslopes.
Yellow Buckeye (Aesculus octandra) - Understory trees and saplings of major dominant species found on the sideslopes.
Post Oak (Quercus stellata) - Found on dry or rocky sites, particularly on ridge tops, upland terraces or sideslopes having a southerly orientation; principal species of the area.
Dogwood (Cornus florida) - Understory tree of the area.
Redbud (Cercis canadensis) - Understory tree of the area.
Sassafras (Sassafras albidum) - Understory tree of the area.
Osage Orange (Maclura pomifera) - Usually found in the woodlands adjacent to the highway and railroad corridors that cross Floyds Fork and is typical of these disturbed environments.
Red Mulberry (Morus rubra) - Usually found in the woodlands adjacent to the highway and railroad corridors that cross Floyds Fork and is typical of these disturbed environments.
Tree-of-Heaven (Ailanthus altissima) - Usually found in the woodlands adjacent to the highway and railroad corridors that cross Floyds Fork and is typical of these disturbed environments.
Sumac (Rhus) - Usually found in the woodlands adjacent to the highway and railroad corridors that cross Floyds Fork and is typical of these disturbed environments.
Red Cedar (Juniperus virginiana) - Found in woodlands in upland locations betraying their origins as abandoned fields or pastures.
Honey Locust (Gleditsia triacanthos) - Found in woodlands in upland locations betraying their origins as abandoned fields or pastures.
Persimmon (Diospyros virginiana) - Found in woodlands in upland locations betraying their origins as abandoned fields or pastures.
American Beech (Fagus grandifolia) - Tree notable for its scarcity or absence in the woodlands of the study area.
Tulip Poplar (Liriodendron tulipifera) - Tree notable for its scarcity or absence in the woodlands of the study area.
Water Willow (Justicia americana) - The most abundant aquatic growing plant growing in and along Floyds Fork.
Silver Maple (Acer saccharinum) - Rapid growth rate, widely spread, sweet sap, ink and dye can be made of bark.

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